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numbers picked out. thanks so much. >> it's five bucks. all right. i'll do it. good luck to all of us. see you tomorrow. it's 9:00 a.m. on the east coast. 6:00 a.m. in the west. i'm carol costello sitting in for kyra phillips. we begin in libya. new day and new sounds of violence in tripoli. explosions and anti-aircraft fire echo across the capital. we'll get the latest from there. >>> witnesses say in government tanks and snipers are in the center of misurata and thofrs a hospitals are overflowing. gadhafi says he will defeat the coalition by any method. and that coalition is growing. this morning we learned that kuwait and jordan joining the list of countries against gadhafi. just minutes ago turkey joined the group. it will provide warships and a submarine to enforce an arms embargo against libya. this military action could be long and drawn out. here's what president obama said about that in an interview with cnn. >> gadhafi may try to hunker down and wait it out even in the face of a no-fly zone even though his forces have been degraded. but keep in mind that we don't just have milita
at cnn world headquarters in atlanta. thanks for joining us. one hour from now the disaster in japan, from the devastation and death to the severe economic impact of the quake and tsunami. that's at 7:00 p.m. eastern. in the meantime, "the situation room with wolf blitzer" begins now. >>> a change in command over coalition air strikes in libya is in the works now this hour. the terms and limits of nato's new role. what it means for the mission and for u.s. forces. libyan rebels now have a new hope of pushing back moammar gadhafi's fighters. we'll tell you about a man who sacrificed his life to help the opposition. plus, the dangers and challenges in the disaster zone of japan. brian todd has an account of the search and rescuers. and our crew, what all of them experienced in the quake and tsunami wreckage. welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." [ explosion ] >>> first to a key battleground city where rebels are making headway in the battle to seize controlle from moammar gadhafi. here's cnn's arwa damon. >>
patrolling off libya's coast, this as the u.s. gets ready to hand over control of the no fly zone to the alliance. whatever that alliance is. we don't know at this time. in the meantime pro car davi forces ratchet up attacks in an eastern city of that country, stopping rebel groups there, but the international air strikes continue and now we have reports that those attacks forced pro qaddafi forces to withdraw tanks from another rebel-held city in the west. a whole lot goes on there today, jon. jon: the libyan leader remains as defiant as ever, appearing from his compound in tripoli and vowing to win the historic battle. now there's word, though, that mommar qaddafi may be planning his exit strategy. secretary of state hillary clinton, weighing in on that on abc's "world news with diane sawyer". >> this is what we hear from so many sources, diane, it is a constanto. >> today? >> today, yesterday, the day before. some of it, i'll be very, you know -- it's my personal opinion -- some of it is theater. a lot of it is just the way he bee haves. it's somewhat unpredictable. but some of
senators gary hart and norm coleman assess president obama's decision to use u.s. military power in libya. >> ifill: then, we get a report from a japan battered by nuclear disaster and now facing elevated radiation levels in its tap water. >> lehrer: miles o'brien looks at the future for u.s. nuclear power in the wake of the japan crisis. >> ifill: ray suarez reports on how the north african nation of morocco is working to avoid becoming the next target of regional unrest. >> reporter: in washington, morocco's foreign minister gave us an overview of king mohammed's planned reforms for a country facing some of the same discontents as its neighbors. >> you know what i feel like? i feel all the time like a cat on a hot tin roof! >> lehrer: and jeffrey brown remembers legendary film star elizabeth taylor who died today at age 79. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people des
. the airport will use tanker trucks to refuel planes today. >>> for a fifth straight day, coalition warplanes bombed military targets around libya's capital today. state tv showed what it said was a military base in flames. coalition air strikes on gadhafi forces outside misrata haven't stopped the shelling of those cities. >>> in yemen, a president under fire puts his supporters on the streets in a noisy demonstration. president salah is under intense pressure to step down immediately, but he is refusing. several of salah's key generals and diplomats switched sides after he launched a bloody crackdown last week. >>> in japan, levels of radioactive iodine in tokyo's water system, they dropped significantly today. officials say it is now safe for babies to drink tap water or for parents who use tap water in formula. but still the city handed out about a quarter million bottles of water today to homes with kids. >>> two fukushima nuclear workers are now in the hospital today for possible radiation poisoning. the men stepped in a puddle while laying cable at the plant. water seeped through the p
. joining us now from jerusalem, david horowitz, ed tore of the "washington post." he will be joining us about what's happening on the ground. we're looking at pictures out of jerusalem. you can see the scene there. a lot of questions, chaotic scene as people scramble to safety to figure out what had actually occurred, what took place. this comes amid a great deal of tension in the middle east, and this is just the latest that we have seen this coming out of israel between israelis and the palestinians, a conflict, and as you know, a peace that has not been achieved in that particular area. we are still waiting for more information, but you can tell from the pictures there, folks are on the phone, trying to get information, clearing the streets, the emergency personnel trying to evacuate the scene. we understand that we have a medic who is on the phone now who is joining us. sir, can you give us your name? >> i am with the american services. >> where are you now? >> i'm on the scene. we are nearly two hours after the explosion. it occurred a few minutes after 3:00 our time next to a bus
out to the united states. senior u.s. officials tell cnn that a brother-in-law has been calling the state department almost every day. arab allies say they're also getting calls. we heard this talk yesterday from secretary of state clinton. it could be a sign that gadhafi's regime is looking for a way out. it could also be disinformation being put forward by the u.s. and others to make gadhafi not trust the people around him. in an interview, president obama said that gadhafi could wait it out, even though his forces have been weakened. today, secretary of state clinton said gadhafi and his inner circle have some choices to make. >> it will be up to gadhafi and his insiders to determine what their next steps are. but we would certainly encourage that they would make the right decision. not only institute a real comprehensive cease-fire, but withdraw from the cities and the military actions and prepare for a transition that does not include colonel gadhafi. the quickest way for him to end this is to actually serve the libyan people by leaving. >> gadhafi shows no sign that he's r
traffic control procedures. u.s. transportation secretary ray lahood calling for at least two air traffic controllers now to man overnight shifts. this after a controller at d.c.'s reagan national airport reportedly fell asleep and two planes couldn't get in touch with the tower after mid night just trying to land. both had to go in for a landing on their own. toes your headlines. >> five hour energy ran out and two planes had to do their own thing. >> i'm sure nothing's down there on the runway. let's cross our fingers. let's talk a little bit about what's going on right now. in libya, new video just in, one of qaddafi's bases reportedly destroyed by u.s. coalition air strikes. look at these pictures, showing a flaming wreckage overnight and qaddafi's compound in tripoli also reportedly targeted again and was struck. the commander of britain's royal air force says libya's air force no longer exists. >> so now that we also have an exclusive story that came to us, i think james rosen and jennifer griffin working on this together. essentially, there might be some break as we try to find o
, but temperatures below average. showers are beginning to break apart to the west of us across front royal and winchester and martinsburg. we could see a little sleet to the north of us for the next couple hours or so, not a point to amount to a lot. lingering morning showers give way to a gradual clearing 47-52 degrees. the extended outlook in a few minutes. now to lisa baden with traffic. >>> looks good on 66 and 95 and the beltway. overnight work on 95. 270, 95 in and out of baltimore looks good between frederick and the beltway. nothing complicated out of southern maryland. the pavement is dry. that will change. there is a complication in landover maryland. inner loop, the first exit for 50 the exit ramp closed because of the crash. >>> two murders two days and two blocks apart. >> this morning a suspect is in custody and charged with the deaths of two men in olney. the accused killer is due to appear in district court in rockville later today. if brianne carter is standing by with details. good morning. >> good morning. the suspect is expected to face a judge later today. authorities
, but despite eight days of bombing the u.s. says military ground forces loyal to president gadhafi still pose a significant threat. on monday, president obama will address the nation on the libyan crisis. >>> disaster in japan. japan's prime minister describes the situation as grave and serious, after another dangerous radiation leak is found at the crippled fukushima nuclear power plant. u.s. navy barges are bringing fresh water to try to head off a meltdown "early" this saturday fresh water to try to head off a meltdown "early" this saturday morning, march 26th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to a gorgeous spring morning in new york city. 20-something degrees. but who cares, it looks nice. >> that's a beautiful picture, russ. >> welcome to "the early show," i'm russ mitchell. >> and i'm rebecca jarvis. we begin with the latest on the battle for libya. rebels have recaptured the key eastern city of ajdabiya. nato takes control of some of the u.s.-led operation in libya in a matter of days, and president obama will address the nation on monday night to explain u.s. involvement in
described to us as a rocket attack, launched by qaddafi's army, captured by cell phone video, and that video foes on for quite a while. it's clear now his forces still on the offensive in so many parts of that country, and that's where we pick up the story this morning, good morning here, i'm bill hemmer live in "america's newsroom" and here we go again. martha: good morning, everybody, i am martha maccallum, great to have you with us. qaddafi's colorful remarks making headlines this morning, he is refusing to back down, with supporters now forming a human shield to protect him at his main compound in the capitol of tripoli. libya's leader, sending this very clear message: >> i'm not afraid to -- of cyclones, i'm not afraid of rains that hover over our heads. i'm standing over here, to fight. to fight them. i am here. i'm here. i'm here. martha: there he is. and there you have it. rick leventhal joining us now with live coverage of all of this, streaming today from benghazi. good morning, rick. >> reporter: good morning, martha. and both sides are talking tough. a rebel spokesman -- or spoke
hollywood star. joining us on the panel this week, writer and fox news contributor judy miller. senior writer at the daily caller, mary katherine. and jim pinkerton new american foundation and new york post columnist kirsten powers. i'm he jon scott, fox news watch is on right now. over time, as codes of law sought to control violence within groups, so did philosophers and clerics and statesmen seek to regulate the destructive power of war. the concept of a just war emerged. suggesting that war is justified only when certain conditions were met. if it is waged as a last resort or in self-defense, if the force used as proportional and if whenever possible civilians are spared from violence. >> jon: that's a small portion of president obama's acceptance speech after the won the nobel peace prize in oslo in 2009. now, we pulled that clip for a couple of reasons. one is simply to ask if what he said in that speech is a justification for what we're now doing in libya, jim? >> well, it depends who you ask. i mean, you know, this is such a great illustration of the partisanship on the media,
and damaging wind. >> remember, you can track the weather using our interactive radar. this is all in your control at wbaltv.com. >> tonight, the world is remembering the legendary elizabeth taylor. the actress died after congestive heart failure. at times, her personal life was a great drama. she was the star of more than 50 movies. >> with her striking movie -- beauty and violet eyes, she was the epitome of a hollywood icon. >> he is the last of that classic star arab -- era. >> when you think classic hollywood, you think elizabeth taylor. what she started when she was just a teenager. to star in /on legendary pictures. she earned five academy award nominations and won two oscars. she was the first woman to earn a million dollars for a film. >> at the time, it was absolutely gigantic. >> on screen, her life is just as dramatic. >> there was more drama than most of the films. >> married 8 times, has the number 6, u.s. senator john warner. >> her heart and soul were just as beautiful as her classic face and majestic eyes. >> it was her romance to richard burton that created a media frenzy.
for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. we begin with an incident at rag an national airport just outside the national's capital. if you're an anxious flyer, well, this will not help. because early wednesday morning, two airliners trying to land at reagan were unable to contact anyone in the control tower. it's reported that the lone air traffic controller on duty was apparently asleep. susan mcginnis is in washington with the latest on this. good morning, susan. tell us what happened here. >> hi, good morning, betty. this is something aviation officials say they have never seen before. first, one pilot calls in to air traffic control at reagan airport here in washington, then a second one does, looking to land, and they're greeted with nothing but silence. it was an event that could have turned out a lot worse. transportation secretary ray lahood has ordered a national review of air traffic control staffing, following a scary incident at reagan national airport. two airliners, loaded with passengers, were trying to land early wednesday, when the control tower suddenly went silent. after
? leave her. >> as we said, our nic robertson is staying at the hotel where it happened. he joins us live now from there. who is this woman and where is she now? >> reporter: she is a middle class woman who lives in tripoli. her tribal name means -- or implies that she is from benghazi in the east of the country and apparently that's what got her into so much trouble. she says when she stopped at a government checkpoint, she came to this hotel because she wanted to tell her story. this is the international journalists were but it reveals perhaps exactly what the opposition fear, what they say happens and how their voices are stifled by the government. it was a very, very shocking event when it took place here. [ speaking foreign language ] she came to tell her story to the only people she thought would listen. international journalists in a city hotel. they're all libyans she calls out. why don't you treat us the same? she claims to have been picked up at a government checkpoint, tied, beaten and raped. her name is imam el abady. my honor was violated by them. it is the first time anyone
for joining us this morning. >> that is something no one wants to talk about -- the possibility of snow. >> we could see a light accumulation. >> folks know that sometimes we get snow on opening day. >> i have been here for four years. maybe this year will be bright and sunny. it will not be this weekend. not good news as we head into the weekend forecast. the temperatures are in the 40's. we're not contending with any wintry mix. we have the possibility of seeing that. the rain has to go through here. i do think the snow will be held at bay at least today. we're in the mid 40's today. by sunday, we will be struggling to reach 40. we have a chance of seeing a light accumulation. right now, let's check out your morning commute. lick.oads are selec we have some new accidents. >> this is southbound on the harrisburg expressway. the other on the right loop approach in the j.f.x. as you travel along wabash, it is closed related to police activity. southbound york road, water main repair continues in the right lane. in catonsville, watch for a rare plant closure at jerusalem because of flooding. fiv
us about that in a moment. good morning, i'm tony perkins in for steve this morning. >> and i'm allison seymour. and we want to get right to tucker well news of how the rest of the day will shape up. we saw the picture, not too pretty. >> not pretty at all. we have fog across the area and cool temperatures. bring along a jacket. our highs today will struggle into the mid to upper 40s and still dealing with leftover rain. your hd radar showing activity breaking out as close as southwest washington, across southern side of the beltway. so all of this will be pushing east and then we still have pretty good rains to the south and west toward fredericksberg, east of culpeper. and this will be pushing into southern maryland in the next hour or so. so a few more showers and maybe steady rain to the south and then we'll see gradual clearing later on today. let's push on and we'll show you the satellite radar. you'll notice out to the west, a lot of cloud cover into ohio and indiana. but we're seeing breaks in kentucky and some of that will get into
's chief science correspondent robert bazell in tokyo. bob, what can you tell us? >> reporter: well, good morning, matt. i can tell you that at the very least this is a major setback in the efforts to contain the reactors. at worst, it's the beginning of a release of more radiation into the environment. >> now, about reactor number 3 -- >> reporter: the apparent leak is in reactor 3 which has been the most troubled at the fukushima site. today prime minister kan addressed the nation. >> translator: the government is stepping up monitoring efforts to control the radiation. >> reporter: the problem came to light when three workers got exposed to excess raidradiation. two of them were taken to a radiation hospital. measurements of the water in the plant found it to be 10,000 times normal radiation. today an official was asked about the source. when you take a look at the water, he said, it appears the source of the radiation is from the reactor. also the government said people living within 18 miles of the site should consider ale voluntary evacuation. earlier they suggested people in the zo
schools to go into lockdown. police do not know how many weapons were used but say they have identified several people of interest. >> if anyone saw anything -- i mean, the littlest thing, to help the police to catch his killer, because it's senseless. and it needs to stop. >> reporter: dobbs just moved to the area from glen burnie. his cousin said he loves football. and almost always had a smile on his face. >> he had a big heart. a kind soul. and he wasn't that type of person to be shot down and murdered like that. my little cousin can't breathe another day. he can't open his eyes. he can't hug his mother. he can't do nothing. >> reporter: both police and the family say they don't know the motive behind the shooting, whether he may have been bullied. >> these are the incidents and the things that happen that stems from people being bullied. you know, people being picked on. i mean, he had dreams, you know. and now them dreams are gone. >> news release sent out late this afternoon. police say this all stemmed from a fight. they would not do an interview with us today. reporting live in
. i am jennifer franciotti. >> i am stan stovall. thank you for joining us this morning. >> what a cold day. >> yesterday was pretty bad. we were stuck in the 40's yesterday. gradual clearing. the next couple of days will be much better than the weekend. sunday, specifically. we're not seeing any kind of wintry mix. there is a batch of rain that still has to get through here. we could see a flake mixing and near the state line. temperatures are pretty positive for us. we're in the low 40's across the area. 44 in annapolis. we will not see much differentiation in the temperatures. we will be in the 40's all day long. turning partly cloudy later this afternoon. a good chance of snow on sunday. more on that coming up. >> the morning commute is kind of busy. we have some flooding left over from yesterday. southbound bel air road, watch for one lane being closed because of flooding. southbound york road, it water main break still being worked on traveling down from lutherville. edgewood road, we have fire department activity. pretty good shape, nine minutes on southbound 895 down to 9
. but you never know. i think all of us who loved her a lot had seen her get through so many extraordinary illnesses. in my case, you know, i sort of watched her over the past 20, 25 years, and she had been very sick many times, and she always had this extraordinary life force, and she sort of pushed through and came back. and i think we all thought that would be the case again, and definitely fervently hoped that. so it -- it's kind of shattering. and i think everybody around her, her very close friends and her family, are just devastated. >> you know, i was trying to think overnight, sally, about why it was that people around the world seemed to identify with her so much. none of us live a life like the one elizabeth taylor lived. and yet perhaps it was the fragility of her that allowed us to identify with her. she had ups and downs like all of us, turbulence, health issues, addiction. is that what you think made people really recognize her? >> i think that's definitely part of it. that she had these real challenges, and she was very honest about them. she was very authentic. i mean, eve
control and found out amazingly that they're used to this. listen. >> american 1900, so you're aware, the tower is apparently not manned. we've made a few phone calls. nobody's answering. so two airports went in the past 10, 19 minutes, so you can expect to go some. >> a reason it's not manned? >> well, i'm going to take a guess and say at that controller got locked out. i've heard of this happening before. >> that's the first time i've heard of it. >> yeah. fortunately, it's not very often, but, yeah, it happened about a year ago. i'm not sure that's what happened now. but anyway, there's nobody in the tower. >> interesting. >> it is. >> both planes did land safely. but changes are coming. ray lahood released a statement saying today i directed the airport to place two air traffic controllers on the midnight shift. it's just not acceptable to have just one controller in the tower managing air traffic in this critical airspace. i've also asked faa administrator randy babbett to study staffing at other airports. >>> and with the number in japan entering 10,000, a 6.2 earthquake rockin
, husband number six, u.s. senator, john warner. >> heart and soul were just as beautiful as her classic face and majestic eyes. >> reporter: but it was her romance to richard burton whom she first married in 1974 and then again in 1985, that created a media frenzy. >> they were trail blazers for the paparazzi. there had never been anything like. that never stars that big. never a romance that famous and public and scandalous. >> reporter: in 2009, she privately mourned the passing of one of her best friends, michael jackson. in her later years, it was her charity work for aids research that she says kept her going. just days after celebrating her 79th birthday in february, taylor was hospitalized with congestive heart failure. she will be remembered for her beauty, generosity and grace. a private family funeral will be held later this week. the family asked that in lew of flowers, donations be made to the elizabeth taylor aids foundation. in los angeles, news4. >> elizabeth taylor had a major connection to the washington area. she married former virginia senator john warner back in 1976
in the west. george is taking time off. great to have dave muir with us. >> good morning, so sad. >> so sad, we're learning about the in legendary actress, liz taylor passing away. she died of congestive heart failure. surrounded the her four children. >> she was hospitaled six weeks ago, her condition stabilized. it was hoped she could return home. obviously not to be. one of her sons calling her an extraordinary woman who lived life to the fullest with great passion, humor and love. we'll talk to our friend in a few minutes. >> liz taylor with those beautiful violet eyes. >> i know. >> she went on to film 50 h films, married 8 times, twice to richard burton. sharyn alfonsi has more on liz taylor's extraordinary life. she was just 12 years old when she filmed "national velvet" in 1954. >> she grew to be one of the most beautiful women in hollywood. she was maggie in "hot tin roof." >> is it a wonder? do you know what i feel like? i feel like a cat on a hot tin roof. >> reporter: by the time she played cleopatra in 1963, she was one of the most famous women in the w
on the constitutionality of mandatory health care but don't want to talk about who pays for the uninsured. that would be us. unless we let them die. what does that cost every year, both financially and in human misery? thanks as always for your comments and continue to the conversation facebook.com/carolcnn. >> thank you, carol. >>> cnn newsroom continues right now with randi kaye in for ali velshi. >> thank you. we're on top of four big stories this hour. allies making inroads in libya. japan reacting to radioactive tap water in tokyo. the first terrorist bombing in jerusalem since 2004. and the passing of a ledged age. that word is sadly overused but no one wore it better than elizabeth taylor. remarking on her death today at 79, taylor's friend elton john said, we have just lost a hollywood giant. more importantly, we have lost an incredible human being. taylor had suffered for years from congestive heart failure and was hospitalized in los angeles for weeks. a former cnn colleague knew elizabeth taylor well and spoke with her many times on the air and off. we're talking about larry king. he joins me no
." >>> the prosecution says that is proof barry bonds used steroids. why one analyst says what we are hearing today may mean more damaging evidence is ahead for the former slugger. >>> and forget waiting for us to tell you. this business sends its own recall warnings. why the most recent one was a little too late though for one customer. >>> yes, she was an actress but she was also an activist. elizabeth taylor's special ties to the bay area. >>> and all the equipment you would find in a music studio donated to students in oakland. who is giving future musicians a leg up today. good evening i'm dana king. ken is off tonight. >>> a secretly recorded conversation took center stage at the barry bonds' trial today and in it bonds' personal trainer talks about injecting bonds. enough to prove bonds is guilty of lying about using steroids? well, listen for yourself. robert lyles has the recording. >> reporter: federal prosecutors waited until today to play for jurors an 8-year- old recording between this man, bonds' boyhood friend and business partner and his former trainer. the record is garbled but listen
, but a dog gave birth do 18 puppies. all the pups and their owners will join live us live. >> i love the little noises they make. >> so a lot coming up, but let's start with libya. fresh reports that rebel fighters have retaken a city. this comes as president obama prepares to address the nation on a mission still very much in debate. richard engel reports. >> reporter: throughout desert, behind the rebel's front line, we follow a secret convoy to bring water and fuel to the the people of ajdabiya, a rebel city still partially held by gadhafi forces. we reach ajdabiya's eastern gate. it's controlled by rebels. and marked by a tattered flag. ajdabiya is mostly deserted, an urban war zone. shops are closed or destroyed. there is to power or running water. just fighting between the revolutionaries and gadhafi's men, says this man. through a broken gate, we enter his home. it was badly damaged by gadhafi's troops. this is shrapnel from the tank round that hit his out and went right in this room. and the fighting isn't over. outside, we hear gunfire. gadhafi's troops are just a few blocks
and some humid air not too far away from us by mid to late afternoon. temperatures are going to be all over the place later today. the farther south you go, the warmer it will be. much warmer in places like fredericksburg, likely in the mid to upper 60s. currently 49. here in washington we're 45. but hagerstown is just 40 degrees. off to the north and east, wilmingtonton 38 and with a wedge of cool air. highs will struggle with 50 north and east of the city. there is your forecast, mostly cloudy skies, showers and thunderstorms likely again. some could be on the strong side late this afternoon and tonight. cooler than yesterday, 58 the daytime high. more details on the forecast in a couple of minutes. back to you. >> tucker, thank you. >>> and we begin with a news alert involving the commute on metro. there is no green line service right now between the congress heights and l'enfant plaza station. this is because of a track problem at anacostia. there is a shuttle bus between the effected stations and we've heard from several passengers from congress heights as a mess with hundreds of peopl
of an air assault on libya. really the third front the u.s. is fighting on these days. it was launched by president obama to protect civilians, he said, because gadhafi's forces were bearing down on the rebels' headquarter city of benghazi. but all those cruise missiles and bombs still haven't stopped the ground fighting. the rebels were under heavy fire today about 100 miles to the south of benghazi. and as you're about to see, our own chief foreign correspondent, richard engel, was with them and got about as close as you'd ever want to. richard is back safely in benghazi tonight and is with us from there tonight. richard, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. the rebels have the will, they have the numbers, but they don't have the equipment or the discipline to take on gadhafi's forces where they're dug in, as we saw for ourselves firsthand today. the road outside benghazi today is a graveyard of gadhafi's armored vehicles, destroyed by western air strikes. after an hour and a half driving south flanked by desert, we reached the rebels' front line. there are no trenches or
's drinking level. robert bazell joins us again this morning. hey, bob. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, ann. we have to point out that the levels of radiation in the drinking water in tokyo are much lower than they are in many cities in the world. as you point out, infants might be at some risk. it has to be unsettling for parents. there is another indication of as long as the reactor keeps spewing radiation we'll have more problems. at the reactor there is hopeful news but more problems, an indication that this is not coming to an end. at this water plant that serves the greater tokyo area, officials found radioactive iodine twice as high as the standard for infants. parents were told to give infants only bottled water. again today black smoke from reactor number 3 forced workers to temporarily evacuate the site. with radiation continuing to leak from the plant workers hooked up power lines to all six reactors. it could be weeks before the cooling systems are operational. reactor 1 reached dangerous temperatures today. work at reactor 2 halted after high levels of radiation we
doctor says qaddafi is out to destroy the city and anyone who lives there. >> he come to kill us. and we are very happy because ... the united nations came and helped us because if they don't come to help us, benghazi would be lost. >>shepard: and breaking news. secretary clinton has just announced and urged qaddafi to leave libya and says the inner circle should "make the right decision." that happening just seconds ago. and now to the videotape of benghazi, today, actually, the recorded media, people taking to the streets in support of the international air campaign this. the u.s. commander in the region says the strikes protected the city from new government attacks and now says international forces are trying to extend the in fly zone to qaddafi's power center of tripoli. we have coverage of our new war on libya, jonathan hunt is on the opposition movement but first to rick leventhal in benghazi much the airstrikes aim to protecting other cities. is it working? >>reporter: well, we have seen the results, between benghazi and to the south where the jets, 95 percent of the missions car
and hilltop locations. we are bringing you team coverage tonight. our chief meteorologist will tell us the approach of the storm but we begin with ken wayne. >> reporter: julie, in just ten minutes ago the rain started coming down here. at times it comes straight down but then the wind will pick up and swirl the rain around. at times it has even turned sideways. the water is calm and the boats appear to be secure. but some boat owners learned the hard way that they have to take precautions as this next storm rolls into the bay area. this was how it looked monday after more than a dozen boats broke free and blown across richardson bay. with 45 miles per hour winds for wind they should check their vessels. we talked to one during the rain showers. >> every-bodies making sure that their boats are tied uptightly and check their moorings. typically boats breaking free from their mooring is the biggest item we would have to deal with. >> yes, i was worried that water was going to come in. >> reporter: she says her 62- foot long sailboat is secure. ron was tending to his 82-foot boat. his big
. culpepper up to 64 degrees. the rest of us will see the temperatures rise. stuck in the clouds. only 43 in hagerstown. even with that cold air you're still going to be talking about some strong thunderstorms that will come on through. we could see potential for some strong winds as well as some hail. we'll continue to keep you posted right here. >> a powerful storm system leaving its mark across the country. here's the scene in central iowa. at least a half dozen tornadoes hit the area. everything from funnel clouds to golf ball size hail left a path of damage in five different counties. that same system caused major problems throughout north dakota. sleet and snow made driving conditions treacherous there. it is just early evidence of a pretty rough start to spring. >>> we have some breaking news in the murder of two men in maryland within days of each other. what are police announcing? >> reporter: we received some shocking details about this just a short time ago. you'll remember that two homicide victims, one was found dead in his home. an 81-year-old man last friday. another man sh
health problems over the years. more details later on. nato said it will start using warships to enforce a united nations arms embargo against libya. also, u.s.-led coalition aircraft attack a base used by moammar gadhafi's forces to strike at the rebel-held city of misrata. president obama flies home from el salvador today and says a plan to hold off the leadership role in libya will go into effect this week. radiation levels in tokyo's water supply are now too high for infants. they are telling parents to use bottled water instead. meantime workers trying to stop radiation leaks at a damaged nuclear power plant were temporarily evacuated today when smoke rose from the complex again. detroit's population has plummeted by 25% over the past decade. this according to startling new census data. the former industrial powerhouse now has the smallest population its had since 1910. google's plan to digitize every book ever published and distribute them online has been rejected by a federal judge. over 15 million books have been scanned in the project that would have created the largest digital
? and is it good or bad? ". although he never saw bonds get injected he was sure the homerun champion was using steroids. he said bonds complained about the pain. "the steroids, the shots were making his butt store." >>> at least a couple of times he says he saw fitness trainer and bonds disappear into his room and he says he later saw the trainer with a syringe. he secretly recorded anderson. in the extremely gashed audio played to the jurors he asked about how steroids tend to cause infections. [ inaudible ] record anderson, remember, was convicted for distributing steroids to pro these. the recording continues with anderson talking about types of steroids he injected. [ inaudible ] >> reporter: bonds attorney allan ruby grilled him on the stand questioning about his motives about the secret recording. he fired hoskins after having found out he forged his signature on memorabilia. he wanted bonds to stop taking the steroids. in fact, he was going to play the recording for bobbed' father but he never did. ruby asked him about some timing issues. hoskins bought that little tape- recorder in 200
the coast to force an arms embargo. jim maceda is live in tripoli, what can you tell us about the latest air strikes on gadhafi's forces around misrata? >> reporter: hi there, willie, that's right, there are now more and more of these air strikes happening in that part of the country, which is much closer to us, miss rat rata about 100 milt of tripoli, there's an indication in place than it was a couple days a go. we are hearing reports, not directly from misrata, from others in misrata, calling relatives outside and then we're picking up information from that, suggesting that there are now, has been a series of air attacks, assaults, bombings, on to the pro-gadhafi forces, and that includes tanks, it includes snipers. it includes obviously troops, mortar rounds -- mortar -- mortar men, and they are still in the -- in the outskirts of misrata and have been doing that every day, penetrating to the center, fighting, intensively, often nine, ten, yesterday, in fact, 40 killed, and then pulling back. trying to squeeze at the same time as they attack misrata, trying to squeeze the city. they've c
as a subject and friend. barbara walters is here with us. you interviewed elizabeth five times. reaction to her death is really breathtaking out there. on tv news, all the way out to twitter. really touched something deep in the country, across the generations, too. why? what was it about her that captured or imagination and held it for so long? >> reporter: well, i did interview her five times, but i also considered elizabeth taylor a friend and many people don't realize this, she had four children, ten grandchildren and four great-grandchildren and she loved them dearly, so, i would like to say that my heart and sympathies go out to her family tonight. but to your question. everything she did was larger than life. she was the most beautiful child star. she was the most exquisite adult leading lady. she had 50 movies, two oscars, eight marriages, two to the same man. scandalous headlines and courageous activism. she lived her life her way and, terry, she didn't give a damn what anybody else thought about it. there are some people for whom even the words superstar seems too small. elizabeth tay
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